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culture

The Culture of a Long-View Math Classroom

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The Culture of a Long-View Math Classroom

At Long-View, we spend a significant amount of time investing in the learning culture of our school, with particular attention paid to how this translates within our mathematics classrooms. As Harvard educator Dr. Richard Elmore has so often made clear, the “default culture of American instruction” contains “certain robust patterns of instructional practice that are unique to the US and that are highly destructive to higher level student learning.” From our standpoint, these highly destructive instructional patterns are easily observed within American math classrooms and at Long-View we seek to disrupt these and nurture within Long-View math classrooms instructional practices that support high cognitive demand and high levels of learning among all students. This starts with deliberate work cultivating an environment that attends in an intentional manner to attitudes, beliefs, customs, and ways of interacting that resist the “default culture of schooling”….

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Summer Remodel and Expansion Brings Opportunity

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Summer Remodel and Expansion Brings Opportunity

It’s the start of a new school year at Long-View and things feel familiar, but at the same time, everything looks a bit different. Summertime was busy with a remodel of new space we recently acquired. We pulled out walls, re-thought the flow between rooms, and added our signature décor that looks more akin to a creative work space than an elementary and middle school, all in preparation for a larger student community and faculty team.  

Getting new spaces ready for our expanded community meant another opportunity to continue to deepen our thinking about how space affects learning and how design of space can positively influence our community….

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How is it an 8-year-old can do that?

How is it an 8-year-old can do that?

Visitors in our Long-View math classes often inquire about the ages of the children, because it is surprising to see such young children engaged in high-level content. How is it that an 8-year-old can do that?

The answer begins with letting go of developmental constraints previously imposed on young learners....